Acudetox India Network

ABOUT ACUDETOX INDIA 

In the present day society,  adolescents ,youth,women and girls find it hard to talk about help, issues related to NCDs ,addiction, trauma, domestic violence, mental health etc. We believe that talking about feelings, trauma asking for help is still a taboo and highly stigmatized and further biggest barrier in effective service delivery at grass root level.

The idea of forming Nada Acudetox India Network was mooted by Nada India to achieve the objectives of promoting barrier free health delivery services among marginalized.Nada India encourages Community Wellness for Behavioral Health including Addictions, Mental Health, and Disaster & Emotional Trauma.

Dr. Michael O’ Smith, psychiatrist and acupuncturist said “NADA Acupuncture teaches us to relax from the inside out.” This increased sense of calm and the quieting of symptoms that occurs as a result of the acupuncture treatment stimulates one’ own “Qi”( one’s inner energy) and brings us back into a more balanced state and chance to communicate. As we become calmer inside, we become much more aware of over selves and others. 

From this quieter, inner place we can then make more careful choices in our reactions to life situations.” 

Read more about AcuDetox.

You can also read about NADA helpful resources here.

ABOUT Nada Acudetox Training

Are you looking for NADA Acupuncture Detoxification Specialist (Acudetox Specialist ) in India or next ADS training or hoping to add NADA protocol into your existing prevention, wellness ,addiction treatment or rehabilitation facility or behavioral health program? Indian Association of Acupuncture Detoxification Specialists is committed to ensure that the training and certification of Acupuncture Detoxification Specialists meet clinical and ethical standards.

Criteria for Acudetox Training in India (as per Indian Association of Acupuncture Detoxification Specialist )

The NADA protocol is an adjunctive formula tool that can be incorporated into any treatment modality for substance misuse, stress reduction , wellness ,trauma and associated issues. It is designed for those who are already working in the stress reduction service, addictions treatment services, trauma center or who want to add to their knowledge and provide other treatment options for their clients. This course is a blended learning experience – theory, practical, group work, ongoing assessment, individual examinations, continuing clinical and professional development and sustained membership. If you are a candidate working with clients who have, trauma, stress and substance misuse issues and you work within a supervised treatment setting then you may be eligible to do the NADA India training (IAADS approved). For example, we have trained candidates with a variety of roles within the De-addiction centers ,Prison Service, Mental Health Trusts, Probation Service, Community Drug and Alcohol Teams. These range from outreach workers, needle exchange workers, nurse specialists, doctors, prison officers, probation officers, physiotherapist etc.


Obtaining a Training Completion Certificate

Every trainee must complete the combined didactic and clinical experience provided and/or overseen by a Nada Trainer. In addition, he or she will demonstrate to the satisfaction of that Nada Trainer a mastery of the basic competencies. Upon successful completion of all requirements (hours and competencies) and an application process, the ADS will receive a Certificate of Training as an Acupuncture Detoxification Specialist/Associate/Assistant Occasionally applicants are not able to demonstrate the required competencies even upon completion of the required hours of training. Such applicants will not be eligible to receive a certificate until they do so. Individuals may work with a Registered Trainer/supervisor to identify deficits and, in partnership, create a plan that will allow the individuals to achieve appropriate mastery of the materials and techniques.


PLEASE NOTE:

The Training Completion Certificate indicates successful completion of NADA acudetox training and demonstration of entry-level skills. NADA does not provide initial or ongoing certification of ADSes.

ADSes are encouraged to maintain competencies and continue to expand their knowledge by pursing continuing education, attending the NADA annual conferences and maintaining active annual membership in the organization. ADSes each sign an Ethics Pledge verifying the understanding of and agreeing to abide by rules regarding limited scope of practice as appropriate, confidentiality, client rapport and respectful treatment, financial interest, and sharing experiences with the NADA community.

NADA asks that each trainee complete a membership application at the onset of training. This membership, good for one year, entitles trainees to all the benefits of membership including the newsletter. Upon successfully completing training requirements and demonstrating mastery, the Registered Trainer will submit the trainee’s completed application for the Certificate of Training as an Acupuncture Detoxification Specialist/Associate/Assistant to the Nada India office, signed by the Registered Trainer, along with the trainee’s signed ethics pledge.

Read more about ear acupuncture and addiction treatment in India.

Read the article_on_acupuncture_and_treatment_readiness.

Click here to participate in acudetox training or read more about Acudetox India here.



SOME PERSPECTIVES ABOUT EAR ACUPUNCTURE

Click here to read about Nada Ear Acupunture.


THE HISTORY OF ACUDETOX INDIA

Nada India promotes two basic approaches one is the use of ear acupuncture at all stages of addiction treatment & rehabilitation and peer based interventions. NADA protocol was developed and spearheaded as a worldwide movement by Dr. Michael O. Smith Psychiatrist and Acupuncturist from New York the Founder of National Acupuncture Detoxification Association.


MEMBERSHIP DETAILS

IAADS is solely funded by its membership dues. Help support the important work of this association and become a member! By becoming a member you will receive:

  • News updates from IAADS bi-monthly newsletter (Updates by email of current events and news ) exclusively devoted to recovery and healing from addictions, trauma, and other behavioral health issues and world wide NADA movement.
  • Discounts on the annual workshop/ conference.
  • Listing on acudetoxservice.blogspot.com of all registered ADS that provide Acupuncture Detoxification Specialist services.
  • Support in starting a new program, advice on how to help maintain a program, and assistance in contacting other NADA professionals who can provide invaluable consultation and guidance worldwide.
Membership:
  • Member for NADA ,ADS ( One years) Rs.300/-
  • Member for NADA ,ADS (Three years) Rs.500/-
  • Life member for NADA ,ADS (one time) Rs.5000/-
  • Associate member /volunteer (Any one who supports the cause) Rs.100/- per annum
Contact for details: E-mail- acudetoxindia@gmail.com, Mob- 9810504544 and send the filled form at following address:
Dr.Ajay Vats Chairperson, IAADS & Training In-charge Contact No. 9810594544
Indian Association of Acupuncture Detoxification Specialists 1073/A-2,C-2 Sondhi Building Ward One Mehrauli New Delhi 110030 India 

You can click here to participate in Acudetox Training Process. Please send an email request at nadaindia@gmail.com along with filled form.


OBJECTIVES OF ACUDETOX INDIA

Indian Association of Acupuncture Detoxification Specialists (IAADS) was registered as a trust on 11/01/2011 in New Delhi with a focus on development of quality services available by NADA, (Acupuncture Detoxification Specialists ADS ) in India by:

  • Promoting and advocating the understanding of the problems and issues faced by health professionals, Counselors, peer counselors who acquired training as Acupuncture Detoxification Specialist (ADS) as per the NADA protocol.
  • Advancing education and research in the field of Holistic health, Ear acupuncture (NADA protocol) and addiction treatment, rehabilitation.
  • Promote and advocate the professional needs of Acupuncture Detoxification Specialists (Like addiction counselor, peer counselor ,social workers and correction officers , physician and mental health professionals etc.) trained and certified as per the norms set by National Acupuncture Detoxification Association ( NADA) especially those working in the Government ,peer led rehabilitation centers, private and other non-governmental organizations.
  • The Trust will undertake initiatives in the areas of ethics, regulatory system, govt. policy vis a vis ADS, accreditation of CME programs, treatment guidelines & data bank related to ADS and their training. To maintain a register of ADS trained and certified as per NADA norms and guidelines.

Read more about the Nada newsletter here.

EAR ACUPUNCTURE PROTOCOL MEETS GLOBAL NEEDS

Developed in the 1970s at Lincoln Hospital (Bronx, NY), the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol was originally used as a supportive component in drug and alcohol treatment settings. The 3-5 point ear acupuncture formula controlled withdrawal symptoms and helped patients become more clear-headed and comfortable. 

Nearly 1,000 licensed drug treatment programs use acupuncture in the U.S. according to federal N-SSATS statistics.

The 21st century has brought a remarkable expansion in the use of the NADA protocol. It is used in 130 prisons in England. Correction officers provide all the treatments under a 5 year training contract by Smart-UK. The jail program was expanded because of an 80% reduction in violent incidents. Post-trauma treatments have been given to community members after 9/11 and Katrina. Treatments for firemen have been permanently institutionalized in both cities. Ear acupuncture for stress has been used by thousands of para military ( Border Security Force) personnel in India through NADA-India.

NADA acupuncture has changed the face of psychiatric hospital care in Northern Europe. 3,000 nurses have been trained in 100 different government facilities. Refugee services in war-torn areas have been particularly impressive. The DARE program in Thailand has provided ear acupuncture for many years with a dozen different Burmese tribes in border camps. NADA was introduced during a 2 week training sponsored by Real Medicine Foundation in refugee camps in East Africa in May 2008. By the end of the year, 18,000 treatments were provided by the refugee trainees. Support was provided for survivors of a violent land dispute.

NADA members have used magnetic beads to treat children with ADHD and autism-spectrum disorders, and violence-prone adolescents. The beads are placed on the back of the ear opposite the shen men point. Bead remains in place with and adhesive 1-2 weeks at a time. Many instance of prolonged improvement have occurred, but this technique is only in an early stage of evaluation.

NADA acupuncture is used on a public health model. Treatments are commonly given in large groups on a frequent basis. Patients sit quietly for 45 minutes in a collective experience. Many jurisdictions have laws that allow a wide range of clinical personnel to be trained to use the NADA protocol in state approved facilities under general supervision of a fully licensed acupuncturist or physician. States that do not have this provision, such as Florida and California, have few NADA programs in comparison with states like Virginia and New York which do have this arrangement.

NADA uses 3-5 ear acupuncture points: sympathetic, shen men, lung, liver and kidney. In many settings only the first 3 points listed above are used. Results seem to be similar with 3 points, and there is less expense in Third World settings. NADA training also involves sterile precautions and social integration with other services. Apprenticeship training is always necessary because the clients are often troubled and distracted. NADA is a non-verbal approach. There are no diagnostic procedures. The ear points provide a balancing effect: some fall asleep; some feel relief of depression; some seem to be meditating. These balancing effects continue from one to several days even though the patient may be exposed to contrasting emergencies during that time. It is a coping and preventive effect. As an added note, Lincoln used electro acupuncture extensively in the 70s. Symptom relief lasted 6-8 hours. Our patients always preferred the prolonged preventive effects of manual acupuncture.

NADA acupuncture adds a valuable component to the behavioral health fields. Its worldwide validation strengthens the entire acupuncture profession. Click here to take the pledge.

Late Dr. Michael O. Smith, Founder NADA.

UPDATES

  • Alcohol Prohibition In Bihar: A Policy Analysis by Suneel Vatsyayan Posted on May 16 '19, in Alcohol's Harm To Others, IOGT, Obstacle To Development, Policy, Prevention, Recovery, Research, Sustainable Development Alcohol: major obstacle to development The situation of women’s safety here in Bihar was such that women would not step outside their homes beyond 6 pm. Alcohol fueled domestic violence had been accepted inside the homes to such an extent that there had been about 85 women in the village who committed suicide seeing no escape.” Ritu Jaiswal, a local politician in Bihar explains how alcohol hinders sustainable development in Bihar, India. Already many years before, in March 2013, Bihari women started protesting alcohol fueled harm in public. “Humari aabroo ki keemat pe sharab ka dhandha nahi chalega.” (The sale of liquor will not continue at the cost of our honour.) The chant echoed through Konar, a village near the town of Sasaram in Bihar’s Rohtas district. That day, around sixty women took to the streets to protest the rampant alcohol use among the men in the village, and the severe consequences of alcohol: violence prevailing in their homes. Local stories of alcohol harm abound Sanjay Kumar, who hails from Patna in Bihar and is a social activist working with the homeless population in Delhi through Ashray Adhikar Abhiyan, shares that alcohol is one of the reasons for homelessness, and further added that children and women run away from home and become homeless increasingly because of alcohol fueled neglect and violence in the family. Nada India peer educator Davender Joti facilitating a self help group for homeless substance users together with Ashray Adhikar Abhiyan, the citizens’ campaign to fight for the rights of the homeless people in India, shared that homelessness and substance are tightly interlinked. Another native from Bihar shared many stories as how alcohol made life miserable for many families. For example when major parts of the family income was spent on alcohol, or when husbands would also snatch money earned by women. This would affect the entire family including the children and their education. He added that poverty, illiteracy and domestic violence were some of the major results of alcohol. Alcohol fuels homelessness in India The Assessment of Pattern and Profile of Substance Use among Children in India conducted by the National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre (NDDTC), the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) showed that two-thirds of children left their home because of domestic violence and conflict in their family, along with other physical abuse by family members. Substance use in fathers, and alcohol attributibal violence against wifes and children were other significant risk factors for children leaving their homes and living on the streets, according to the report. Prohibition in Bihar as reaction to the alcohol harm epidemic In November 2015, Nitish Kumar, the newly elected chief minister promised to ban liquor before the state Assembly elections and made the announcement at an official function to mark Prohibition Day in the state capital. Three years later due to prohibition women find themselves in the position to spend their meagre income on their children’s education and health. Reports from other states after the implementation of prohibition also showed decreased incidences of violence against women. But not all alcohol-related problems disappeared. While the overall prevalence of current alcohol use declined in states with alcohol prohibition, a substantial proportion of consumers were using alcohol in a dependent manner in Gujarat (30%), Bihar (16%), Manipur (17%) and Nagaland (20%). Compared to the national figure of 18.5% some of the prohibition states fare better but others fare worse, showing that alcohol problems, especially alcohol use disorders do not simply disappear with alcohol prohibition. The alcohol ban in Bihar was implemented through the Bihar Prohibition and Excise Act that came into effect on April 1, 2016. The Act states: No person shall manufacture, bottle, distribute, transport, collect, store, possess, purchase, sell or consume any intoxicant or liquor.” In my opinion, the ban on liquor as only option in different states of the country has not produced the expected results as the decision was not “participatory” enough – even though women in affected states have been mounting massive protests and impressive manifestations of their will to tackle alcohol harm; and even though some results of the alcohol ban are impressive. The calm confidence of women involving themselves directly in local administration and other public matters had been a rare sight in rural Bihar before. But women are changing this notion. Panchayat led by sensitized women could mobilize great support to prohibition in a more sustained manner in light of violence against women and children and people in general, to the effect that we may not find people consuming liquor in public spaces openly anymore if every individual is aware and able to take a stand against it and participate at local level. Is Bihar Faring Better Or Worse After Alcohol Ban? Local ownership of any alcohol policy essential As Gandhi as rightly said: “In the true democracy of India, the unit is the village. Every village has to become a self sufficient republic.” Thus, Panchayats being at the grass roots are yet to collaborate with the local government. Panchayats being the first and grass root level of governance can play the most effective role in sensitization, prevention and referral of people with potential substance use disorders and thereby provide social support to growing needs and problems of today’s village in a consumerist environment where alcohol is increasingly treated as an ordinary commodity – even though all evidence shows it is not. In fact alcohol is a great obstacle to development of villages, communities, and whole societies. On persisting with the law, Nitish Kumar, the Chief Minister of Bihar, had told the Bihar Assembly: Murders are committed despite a law against it. That does not mean the law has failed. What is needed is greater social awareness.” In this spirit, Nada India raised the issue of alcohol as a threat to women security to be included in the manifesto of major political parties in the coming Indian parliament elections-2019 at a consultation on Women Security organized by Shivi Development Society in Delhi. Magnitude of alcohol harm It is worrying to know that the National Survey on Extent and Pattern of Substance Use in India (2019) showed that alcohol is the most common psychoactive substance used by Indians. It is an alarming situation nationally, wherein about 14.6% of the population (between 10 and 75 years of age) use alcohol. In terms of absolute numbers, there are about 16 crore people who consume alcohol in the country. States with the highest prevalence of alcohol use were Chhattisgarh, Tripura, Punjab, Arunachal Pradesh and Goa – none of them states where alcohol prohibition is implemented. India neither has a National Alcohol Policy nor a Drug Demand Reduction Policy, though an attempt was made in the past at the central Government’s level, to draft a drug demand reduction strategy which couldn’t be tabled in the parliament. My fear is that in the absence of a National policy, the only option available for state intervention is to have prohibition and thus, India urgently needs a comprehensive alcohol control policy as well as the drug demand reduction policy. I strongly feel that a renewed focus is needed on prevention and health promotion, which are critical to creating norms and environments in our communities and in the Panchayats that foster the highest attainable standard of physical, mental and social well-being. Dr.Monika Arora, the Director for Health Promotion at the Public Health Foundation of India reiterated the same concern that India needs a comprehensive policy to address one of the five major risk factors of non-communicable diseases and to fullfill its commitment to achieve the national target of the 10% relative reduction in alcohol use by 2025. Till now, alcohol has been regulated at the level of state governments through excise departments, but the burden of this risk factor is felt by the health, social justice and finance departments.
    x
    Alcohol Prohibition In Bihar: A Policy Analysis by Suneel Vatsyayan Posted on May 16 '19, in Alcohol's Harm To Others, IOGT, Obstacle To Development, Policy, Prevention, Recovery, Research, Sustainable Development Alcohol: major obstacle to development The situation of women’s safety here in Bihar was such that women would not step outside their homes beyond 6 pm. Alcohol fueled domestic violence had been accepted inside the homes to such an extent that there had been about 85 women in the village who committed suicide seeing no escape.” Ritu Jaiswal, a local politician in Bihar explains how alcohol hinders sustainable development in Bihar, India. Already many years before, in March 2013, Bihari women started protesting alcohol fueled harm in public. “Humari aabroo ki keemat pe sharab ka dhandha nahi chalega.” (The sale of liquor will not continue at the cost of our honour.) The chant echoed through Konar, a village near the town of Sasaram in Bihar’s Rohtas district. That day, around sixty women took to the streets to protest the rampant alcohol use among the men in the village, and the severe consequences of alcohol: violence prevailing in their homes. Local stories of alcohol harm abound Sanjay Kumar, who hails from Patna in Bihar and is a social activist working with the homeless population in Delhi through Ashray Adhikar Abhiyan, shares that alcohol is one of the reasons for homelessness, and further added that children and women run away from home and become homeless increasingly because of alcohol fueled neglect and violence in the family. Nada India peer educator Davender Joti facilitating a self help group for homeless substance users together with Ashray Adhikar Abhiyan, the citizens’ campaign to fight for the rights of the homeless people in India, shared that homelessness and substance are tightly interlinked. Another native from Bihar shared many stories as how alcohol made life miserable for many families. For example when major parts of the family income was spent on alcohol, or when husbands would also snatch money earned by women. This would affect the entire family including the children and their education. He added that poverty, illiteracy and domestic violence were some of the major results of alcohol. Alcohol fuels homelessness in India The Assessment of Pattern and Profile of Substance Use among Children in India conducted by the National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre (NDDTC), the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) showed that two-thirds of children left their home because of domestic violence and conflict in their family, along with other physical abuse by family members. Substance use in fathers, and alcohol attributibal violence against wifes and children were other significant risk factors for children leaving their homes and living on the streets, according to the report. Prohibition in Bihar as reaction to the alcohol harm epidemic In November 2015, Nitish Kumar, the newly elected chief minister promised to ban liquor before the state Assembly elections and made the announcement at an official function to mark Prohibition Day in the state capital. Three years later due to prohibition women find themselves in the position to spend their meagre income on their children’s education and health. Reports from other states after the implementation of prohibition also showed decreased incidences of violence against women. But not all alcohol-related problems disappeared. While the overall prevalence of current alcohol use declined in states with alcohol prohibition, a substantial proportion of consumers were using alcohol in a dependent manner in Gujarat (30%), Bihar (16%), Manipur (17%) and Nagaland (20%). Compared to the national figure of 18.5% some of the prohibition states fare better but others fare worse, showing that alcohol problems, especially alcohol use disorders do not simply disappear with alcohol prohibition. The alcohol ban in Bihar was implemented through the Bihar Prohibition and Excise Act that came into effect on April 1, 2016. The Act states: No person shall manufacture, bottle, distribute, transport, collect, store, possess, purchase, sell or consume any intoxicant or liquor.” In my opinion, the ban on liquor as only option in different states of the country has not produced the expected results as the decision was not “participatory” enough – even though women in affected states have been mounting massive protests and impressive manifestations of their will to tackle alcohol harm; and even though some results of the alcohol ban are impressive. The calm confidence of women involving themselves directly in local administration and other public matters had been a rare sight in rural Bihar before. But women are changing this notion. Panchayat led by sensitized women could mobilize great support to prohibition in a more sustained manner in light of violence against women and children and people in general, to the effect that we may not find people consuming liquor in public spaces openly anymore if every individual is aware and able to take a stand against it and participate at local level. Is Bihar Faring Better Or Worse After Alcohol Ban? Local ownership of any alcohol policy essential As Gandhi as rightly said: “In the true democracy of India, the unit is the village. Every village has to become a self sufficient republic.” Thus, Panchayats being at the grass roots are yet to collaborate with the local government. Panchayats being the first and grass root level of governance can play the most effective role in sensitization, prevention and referral of people with potential substance use disorders and thereby provide social support to growing needs and problems of today’s village in a consumerist environment where alcohol is increasingly treated as an ordinary commodity – even though all evidence shows it is not. In fact alcohol is a great obstacle to development of villages, communities, and whole societies. On persisting with the law, Nitish Kumar, the Chief Minister of Bihar, had told the Bihar Assembly: Murders are committed despite a law against it. That does not mean the law has failed. What is needed is greater social awareness.” In this spirit, Nada India raised the issue of alcohol as a threat to women security to be included in the manifesto of major political parties in the coming Indian parliament elections-2019 at a consultation on Women Security organized by Shivi Development Society in Delhi. Magnitude of alcohol harm It is worrying to know that the National Survey on Extent and Pattern of Substance Use in India (2019) showed that alcohol is the most common psychoactive substance used by Indians. It is an alarming situation nationally, wherein about 14.6% of the population (between 10 and 75 years of age) use alcohol. In terms of absolute numbers, there are about 16 crore people who consume alcohol in the country. States with the highest prevalence of alcohol use were Chhattisgarh, Tripura, Punjab, Arunachal Pradesh and Goa – none of them states where alcohol prohibition is implemented. India neither has a National Alcohol Policy nor a Drug Demand Reduction Policy, though an attempt was made in the past at the central Government’s level, to draft a drug demand reduction strategy which couldn’t be tabled in the parliament. My fear is that in the absence of a National policy, the only option available for state intervention is to have prohibition and thus, India urgently needs a comprehensive alcohol control policy as well as the drug demand reduction policy. I strongly feel that a renewed focus is needed on prevention and health promotion, which are critical to creating norms and environments in our communities and in the Panchayats that foster the highest attainable standard of physical, mental and social well-being. Dr.Monika Arora, the Director for Health Promotion at the Public Health Foundation of India reiterated the same concern that India needs a comprehensive policy to address one of the five major risk factors of non-communicable diseases and to fullfill its commitment to achieve the national target of the 10% relative reduction in alcohol use by 2025. Till now, alcohol has been regulated at the level of state governments through excise departments, but the burden of this risk factor is felt by the health, social justice and finance departments.
  • Alcoholism became a social evil. Poverty, illiteracy, domestic violence were the outcome of alcoholism. Due to prohibition women can spend their meagre income on children education and health. Liquor Prohibition in Bihar was a revolutionary step by the Bihar Government in 2016. With only 11% urban population, majority of the people live in villages and that too on a very meagre income. As we know the main source of employment is agriculture and majority of the workforce are female. Male usually migrate to other metro cities in search of employment and better life. The liquor ban was a much needed relief for women whose husband were become alcoholic. There was widespread oppose of wine shops and countrymade liquor in the state. The ban has its social ramifications in terms of domestic violence, education for the children in poorer families and social harmony in the society. Women were complaining and were protesting against the liquor shops. Many shared their stories as how alcohol made their life miserable. A major part of the income was spent on liquor, sometimes their husbands also snatch money earned by women. This affected the entire family including children and their education. Alcoholism became a social evil. Poverty, illiteracy, domestic violence were the outcome of alcoholism. Due to prohibition women can spend their meagre income on children education and health.
    x
    Alcoholism became a social evil. Poverty, illiteracy, domestic violence were the outcome of alcoholism. Due to prohibition women can spend their meagre income on children education and health. Liquor Prohibition in Bihar was a revolutionary step by the Bihar Government in 2016. With only 11% urban population, majority of the people live in villages and that too on a very meagre income. As we know the main source of employment is agriculture and majority of the workforce are female. Male usually migrate to other metro cities in search of employment and better life. The liquor ban was a much needed relief for women whose husband were become alcoholic. There was widespread oppose of wine shops and countrymade liquor in the state. The ban has its social ramifications in terms of domestic violence, education for the children in poorer families and social harmony in the society. Women were complaining and were protesting against the liquor shops. Many shared their stories as how alcohol made their life miserable. A major part of the income was spent on liquor, sometimes their husbands also snatch money earned by women. This affected the entire family including children and their education. Alcoholism became a social evil. Poverty, illiteracy, domestic violence were the outcome of alcoholism. Due to prohibition women can spend their meagre income on children education and health.
  • Are you looking for NADA Acupuncture Detoxification Specialist (Acudetox Specialist ) in India or next ADS training or hoping to add NADA protocol into your existing prevention, wellness ,addiction treatment or rehabilitation facility or behavioral health program?
    Are you looking for NADA Acupuncture Detoxification Specialist (Acudetox Specialist ) in India or next ADS training or hoping to add NADA protocol into your existing prevention, wellness ,addiction treatment or rehabilitation facility or behavioral health program?
    x
    Are you looking for NADA Acupuncture Detoxification Specialist (Acudetox Specialist ) in India or next ADS training or hoping to add NADA protocol into your existing prevention, wellness ,addiction treatment or rehabilitation facility or behavioral health program?
    Are you looking for NADA Acupuncture Detoxification Specialist (Acudetox Specialist ) in India or next ADS training or hoping to add NADA protocol into your existing prevention, wellness ,addiction treatment or rehabilitation facility or behavioral health program?
  • As member of the steering group of the Community of Practice on NCDs and Commercial Determinants of Health hosted by the WHO/GCM and the Global Health Centre at Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, I am happy to invite you to the kick-off webinar on Tuesday, 20th November 2018. Commercial Actors = Health Actors? The commercial determinants of health – towards a productive debate Tuesday, 20th of November 2018, New York: 9 am / Berlin: 3 pm / Mumbai: 7:30 pm -
    x
    As member of the steering group of the Community of Practice on NCDs and Commercial Determinants of Health hosted by the WHO/GCM and the Global Health Centre at Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, I am happy to invite you to the kick-off webinar on Tuesday, 20th November 2018. Commercial Actors = Health Actors? The commercial determinants of health – towards a productive debate Tuesday, 20th of November 2018, New York: 9 am / Berlin: 3 pm / Mumbai: 7:30 pm -
  • Drink Revolution pre-launch party @ARSD College in Collaboration with NISD  SENSITIZATION PROGRAMME
PREVENTION OF DRUG ABUSE AMONG THE YOUTH
About 170 students participated in this training programme. Participants were from Ram Lal Anand College ,Aryabhatta College, Maitreyi College, Rajdhani College, Kalindi College, P.G.D.A.V College and A.R.S.D College. 
The First Session was taken by Suneel Vatsayan, founder and chairperson of NADA India Foundation. He is an avid researcher, philanthropist and blogger who has been associated with IOGT International for more than three decades. He is actively engaged in the field of sensitising adolescent community in the slum, villages, schools and colleges on various issues like HIV, NCDs, alcohol/ drug abuse and violence. 

His session was very interactive and lively which included examples that established a very good rapport with the audience. He also shared his experiences of working with drug users and people afflicted with non communicable diseases (NCDs) and peer education work with undergraduate students of various disciplines. He explained in details the terminologies associated that are use, misuse / harmful use, abuse, dependence, addiction and detoxification. 
He began his session with an experiential exercise on identifying any one disease that any of the family members had and the coping mechanism of family members during those times. He remarked that the past mistakes are meant to guide us in future. It is in this context he talked about drug de-addiction so that students could empathise with the situation of family members of drug addicts. He stressed that language of recovery must be used in such situations so the word addict should be replaced by drug dependent. He discussed the reasons that make the youth more susceptible to drug abuse. The adolescent within youth battling with identity crisis, need of privacy, curiosity, mood swings, peer pressure sometimes resort to drugs as a means of relaxation and before they even realise they fall in the vicious cycle of addiction.  Drugs become peace at any price as they provide reliable escape from personal consciousness and risk of unpredictable pain; addiction is a disease of “more”. 
A majority of youth fall into this trap unknowingly hence it becomes very important to treat them. The treatment of drug abuse and recovery process begins with management of chemical symptoms of withdrawal and craving. This is followed by providing safety, social support, education about addiction, basic issues of personal growth. The role of family and society in the second phase becomes very important.  He coined “Tough Love” as the best description of treatment strategy. Its a seemingly impossible combination of strong discipline and unquestioning support. “Tough Love” is part of any parenting or teaching effort. The different steps in the detoxification process were also discussed. In the end he remarked that the strong will power to recover plays a very important role in the process of recovery. He concluded his talk by discussing how NADA foundation is dealing with this problem existing in our society by the technical assistance programme it runs.
    Drink Revolution pre-launch party @ARSD College in Collaboration with NISD SENSITIZATION PROGRAMME PREVENTION OF DRUG ABUSE AMONG THE YOUTH About 170 students participated in this training programme. Participants were from Ram Lal Anand College ,Aryabhatta College, Maitreyi College, Rajdhani College, Kalindi College, P.G.D.A.V College and A.R.S.D College. The First Session was taken by Suneel Vatsayan, founder and chairperson of NADA India Foundation. He is an avid researcher, philanthropist and blogger who has been associated with IOGT International for more than three decades. He is actively engaged in the field of sensitising adolescent community in the slum, villages, schools and colleges on various issues like HIV, NCDs, alcohol/ drug abuse and violence. His session was very interactive and lively which included examples that established a very good rapport with the audience. He also shared his experiences of working with drug users and people afflicted with non communicable diseases (NCDs) and peer education work with undergraduate students of various disciplines. He explained in details the terminologies associated that are use, misuse / harmful use, abuse, dependence, addiction and detoxification. He began his session with an experiential exercise on identifying any one disease that any of the family members had and the coping mechanism of family members during those times. He remarked that the past mistakes are meant to guide us in future. It is in this context he talked about drug de-addiction so that students could empathise with the situation of family members of drug addicts. He stressed that language of recovery must be used in such situations so the word addict should be replaced by drug dependent. He discussed the reasons that make the youth more susceptible to drug abuse. The adolescent within youth battling with identity crisis, need of privacy, curiosity, mood swings, peer pressure sometimes resort to drugs as a means of relaxation and before they even realise they fall in the vicious cycle of addiction. Drugs become peace at any price as they provide reliable escape from personal consciousness and risk of unpredictable pain; addiction is a disease of “more”. A majority of youth fall into this trap unknowingly hence it becomes very important to treat them. The treatment of drug abuse and recovery process begins with management of chemical symptoms of withdrawal and craving. This is followed by providing safety, social support, education about addiction, basic issues of personal growth. The role of family and society in the second phase becomes very important. He coined “Tough Love” as the best description of treatment strategy. Its a seemingly impossible combination of strong discipline and unquestioning support. “Tough Love” is part of any parenting or teaching effort. The different steps in the detoxification process were also discussed. In the end he remarked that the strong will power to recover plays a very important role in the process of recovery. He concluded his talk by discussing how NADA foundation is dealing with this problem existing in our society by the technical assistance programme it runs.
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    Drink Revolution pre-launch party @ARSD College in Collaboration with NISD  SENSITIZATION PROGRAMME
PREVENTION OF DRUG ABUSE AMONG THE YOUTH
About 170 students participated in this training programme. Participants were from Ram Lal Anand College ,Aryabhatta College, Maitreyi College, Rajdhani College, Kalindi College, P.G.D.A.V College and A.R.S.D College. 
The First Session was taken by Suneel Vatsayan, founder and chairperson of NADA India Foundation. He is an avid researcher, philanthropist and blogger who has been associated with IOGT International for more than three decades. He is actively engaged in the field of sensitising adolescent community in the slum, villages, schools and colleges on various issues like HIV, NCDs, alcohol/ drug abuse and violence. 

His session was very interactive and lively which included examples that established a very good rapport with the audience. He also shared his experiences of working with drug users and people afflicted with non communicable diseases (NCDs) and peer education work with undergraduate students of various disciplines. He explained in details the terminologies associated that are use, misuse / harmful use, abuse, dependence, addiction and detoxification. 
He began his session with an experiential exercise on identifying any one disease that any of the family members had and the coping mechanism of family members during those times. He remarked that the past mistakes are meant to guide us in future. It is in this context he talked about drug de-addiction so that students could empathise with the situation of family members of drug addicts. He stressed that language of recovery must be used in such situations so the word addict should be replaced by drug dependent. He discussed the reasons that make the youth more susceptible to drug abuse. The adolescent within youth battling with identity crisis, need of privacy, curiosity, mood swings, peer pressure sometimes resort to drugs as a means of relaxation and before they even realise they fall in the vicious cycle of addiction.  Drugs become peace at any price as they provide reliable escape from personal consciousness and risk of unpredictable pain; addiction is a disease of “more”. 
A majority of youth fall into this trap unknowingly hence it becomes very important to treat them. The treatment of drug abuse and recovery process begins with management of chemical symptoms of withdrawal and craving. This is followed by providing safety, social support, education about addiction, basic issues of personal growth. The role of family and society in the second phase becomes very important.  He coined “Tough Love” as the best description of treatment strategy. Its a seemingly impossible combination of strong discipline and unquestioning support. “Tough Love” is part of any parenting or teaching effort. The different steps in the detoxification process were also discussed. In the end he remarked that the strong will power to recover plays a very important role in the process of recovery. He concluded his talk by discussing how NADA foundation is dealing with this problem existing in our society by the technical assistance programme it runs.
    Drink Revolution pre-launch party @ARSD College in Collaboration with NISD SENSITIZATION PROGRAMME PREVENTION OF DRUG ABUSE AMONG THE YOUTH About 170 students participated in this training programme. Participants were from Ram Lal Anand College ,Aryabhatta College, Maitreyi College, Rajdhani College, Kalindi College, P.G.D.A.V College and A.R.S.D College. The First Session was taken by Suneel Vatsayan, founder and chairperson of NADA India Foundation. He is an avid researcher, philanthropist and blogger who has been associated with IOGT International for more than three decades. He is actively engaged in the field of sensitising adolescent community in the slum, villages, schools and colleges on various issues like HIV, NCDs, alcohol/ drug abuse and violence. His session was very interactive and lively which included examples that established a very good rapport with the audience. He also shared his experiences of working with drug users and people afflicted with non communicable diseases (NCDs) and peer education work with undergraduate students of various disciplines. He explained in details the terminologies associated that are use, misuse / harmful use, abuse, dependence, addiction and detoxification. He began his session with an experiential exercise on identifying any one disease that any of the family members had and the coping mechanism of family members during those times. He remarked that the past mistakes are meant to guide us in future. It is in this context he talked about drug de-addiction so that students could empathise with the situation of family members of drug addicts. He stressed that language of recovery must be used in such situations so the word addict should be replaced by drug dependent. He discussed the reasons that make the youth more susceptible to drug abuse. The adolescent within youth battling with identity crisis, need of privacy, curiosity, mood swings, peer pressure sometimes resort to drugs as a means of relaxation and before they even realise they fall in the vicious cycle of addiction. Drugs become peace at any price as they provide reliable escape from personal consciousness and risk of unpredictable pain; addiction is a disease of “more”. A majority of youth fall into this trap unknowingly hence it becomes very important to treat them. The treatment of drug abuse and recovery process begins with management of chemical symptoms of withdrawal and craving. This is followed by providing safety, social support, education about addiction, basic issues of personal growth. The role of family and society in the second phase becomes very important. He coined “Tough Love” as the best description of treatment strategy. Its a seemingly impossible combination of strong discipline and unquestioning support. “Tough Love” is part of any parenting or teaching effort. The different steps in the detoxification process were also discussed. In the end he remarked that the strong will power to recover plays a very important role in the process of recovery. He concluded his talk by discussing how NADA foundation is dealing with this problem existing in our society by the technical assistance programme it runs.